| Current Toronto Time: 
Careers in skilled trades for newcomers and youth


According to a recent Canadian report, there will be projected labour shortages in a number of skilled trades, including industrial and power system electricians, supervisors in railway and motor transportation occupations.

Skilled trades impact virtually all aspects of our day-to-day lives. Without properly trained skilled trades-people on the job, many of the things we take for granted on a daily basis could be jeopardized.

We rely on the thousands of skilled tradespeople in Ontario to be able to safely drive to the grocery store, visit restaurants, take public transit without worry, and keep the lights on in our homes and workplaces.

Yet, according to a recently released report by Employment and Social Development Canada, there will be projected labour shortages in a number of trades, including industrial and power system electricians, supervisors in railway and motor transportation occupations, and welders and related machine operators.

David Cameron, a welder and learning and development team leader at ArcelorMittal Dofasco knows his organization will soon face a shortage.

“Our company could lose 500 or more maintenance employees due to retirements in the next five years,” he says.

“With a looming skilled workforce shortage, students and their parents should be discussing the unlimited career possibilities in the trades,” advises David Tsubouchi, the Ontario College of Trades` CEO.

“An apprenticeship is a great way to earn money while learning a trade and working towards a rewarding and in-demand career.”

To address the predicted shortages and promote the skilled trades, the College – the professional regulatory body whose mandate is to protect the public interest by regulating and promoting the skilled trades in Ontario – participated in over 200 events in 2015.

“Attending industry events, meetings and competitions, I see that there are great young individuals entering our trade, and I feel good about what they will bring to the industry’s future,” says Jim Pinder, a truck and coach technician Trade Board member.

According to a recent poll, 95 per cent of Ontario parents are supportive of their children working in a trade-related profession, yet many are not talking about it.

A 2016 Ipsos Reid poll showed that working in the skilled trades rated favourably among Ontario parents, placing it slightly ahead of both the financial and service industries.

However, despite this approval, results showed only 38 per cent of parents have talked to their children about apprenticeship opportunities and a future career in the skilled trades.

“It’s important they let kids know an apprenticeship is a great way to earn money while learning a trade and working towards a rewarding and in-demand career,” say Tsubouchi.

“The promotion of trades as a viable career has to be supported everywhere possible,” says Cameron.

“That message has to get to students and their parents, teachers and guidance counsellors.”

To help set your child up for a rewarding career in the skilled trades, work together to choose courses based on their educational goals and interests.

Discuss specific trades professions and identify the compulsory courses required.

For instance, many apprenticeship and college trades programs require Grade 12 math, physics and/or chemistry to apply.

Once your child has settled on a career path, ensure they complete the prerequisites for each course.

To help parents and children interested in apprenticeship opportunities learn more, the College has a youth-focused website, earn whileyoulearn.ca, featuring videos and information about the many benefits of apprenticeships and careers in skilled trades.

For more information on a career in the skilled trades in Ontario, visit www.earnwhileyoulearn.ca.

– News Canada

Posted: Oct 4, 2016

August 2017



Centennial College



Smart Canadian


Immigration Peel Canada



© CanadaBound Immigrant 2016