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Mentors help newcomers achieve their goals


Marsha John-Green-wood moved to Canada from the United Kingdom in 2015. She has a background in human resources consultation and change management.

Today, she is the HR Transformation Lead at LCBO and made the decision to give back and become a mentor after her experience as a mentee. She has completed two partnerships.

When and how did you originally become involved in TRIEC Mentoring Partnership as a mentee?

I became involved with TRIEC Mentoring Partnership in 2016 as part of my HR bridging program.

Why did you become a mentor?

I always had a desire to volunteer and give something back. I have mentored undergraduates and work colleagues previously. I want to share what I have learnt through my personal or career journey. Being a mentor with TRIEC Mentoring Partnership has been a perfect opportunity to do this in a supportive environment where I too had been mentored.

How did mentoring help you with finding your first job in Canada?

Mentoring provided me with a sounding board, good feedback and encouragement.

Can you give an example of how you’ve put your learning from the program into practice?

I used my learning as a mentee to seek more from my own mentees. It has taught me the importance of helping my mentees recognize their strengths and assist them to dig deep, persevere and also to be resourceful.

What advice would you give to a new mentee about how to make the most of the mentoring relationship?

Be open to doing things differently, stay engaged, and be proactive.

What does being a mentor now mean to you?

Being a mentor gives me a sense of satisfaction to share what I have learned and experienced especially as I have been in my mentees’ shoes.

The future of mentoring is...

...essential to supporting those who want to pursue their career goals.

 

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Lorenzo Conte works as a human resources information systems consultant for the City of Toronto. He graduated in computer science and worked in IT, human resources and education before moving to Canada from Italy in 2014. He enrolled as a mentee in TRIEC Mentoring Partnership in 2014 and made the decision to become a mentor last year.

When and how did you originally become involved in TRIEC Mentoring Partnership as a mentee? Which agency did you work with?

In 2014, I attended French classes for newcomers and I met a mentoring/job coach from the TRIEC Mentoring Partnership program who suggested I participate. The agency I worked with was JobStart.

How did the agency support and help you in your career goals?

JobStart connected me with a mentor who helped me have a better understanding of my goals and my possibilities in the labour market. My mentor also connected me with other professionals with experience in my field.

Why did you become a mentor?

I came across the City of Toronto’s Mentoring Partnership Program in my corporate intranet and when I read I could make a lasting difference in the life of a new immigrant I felt the call – I received help when I arrived and I wanted to share my experience and challenges with others looking for their first job in Canada

How did mentoring help you with finding your first job in Canada?

Mentoring helped me understand where my skills would fit in Toronto’s labour market.

Can you give an example of how you’ve put your learning from the program into practice?

Even though my aspiration was to become an IT Manager, I leveraged my most recent experience as an adult’s educator to get my first job. I had the perception that Canadian experience was considered more than what I did in other countries, so I worked on my professional development, networking within my organization and obtained career advancements and a permanent position.

What advice would you give to a new mentee about how to make the most of the mentoring relationship?

Try to make sure the mentor knows what your goals and expectations are without losing focus on what your dreams are. Accept other opportunities that can lead you to your final goal.

What does being a mentor now mean to you?

A person who the mentee can trust, who understands their strengths, knowledge gaps, and objectives. And based on the current job opportunities, guide them making informed decisions

The future of mentoring is…

...to guide others in making informed decisions.

The Mentoring Partnership matches internationally trained newcomers with established Canadians in occupations-specific partnerships to learn about the Canadian job market. Partnerships run 24 hours over four months with 75 per cent of mentees reporting finding work in their professional field within 12 months of completing the program.

It is a collaboration of employer and community partners, and operates as a program of TRIEC. TRIEC creates and champions solutions to better integrate skilled immigrants in the Greater Toronto labour market. 

More information on TRIEC and The Mentoring Partnership at TRIEC.ca, TheMentoringPartnership.com or @TRIEC. 

                                                                                                                                                                    – Daniel Kim

Posted: Jun 5, 2019

October 2019

Centennial College



Immigration Peel Canada



© CanadaBound Immigrant 2016